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rozbrna Mar 10, 2016 12:34 PM
Please, could you explain how you are defining differetn versions of the datasets, like f.e: http://www.eea.europa.eu/[…]/eea-reference-grids-2
which has current and previous versions.

Are the versions including evolutive work on the data, so each dataset has more recent and updated data? Or the version is kind of corrigenda of the previous versions?

Why do you think it is important to make older versions accessible?

Thank you.

Nataliya
Replies (1)
EEA Mar 11, 2016 10:53 AM
Dear rozbrna,
Here is the response from our experts:
Are the versions including evolutive work on the data, so each dataset has more recent and updated data? Or the version is kind of corrigenda of the previous versions?
It is more the first. Each new version of the dataset has newer data (with corrections as well, if they were found while adding more recent data). The new versions always replace completely the previous versions which become obsolete and there only for reference.
When there are only corrections/corrigenda of the same dataset version, we normally do not create complete new version, we instead replace the dataset files and we update the field "Last upload" date with the date when the new uploaded corrected data was made.

Why do you think it is important to make older versions accessible?
Nice to hear this question.
The previous versions are made available to keep reference integrity and give an exact URL to the specific release of that data set version.

Let us give you an example:

If a researcher / data scientist / policy make uses / creates a chart or a statement based on data from a dataset produced by us, he/she can point directly to that official specific release of that dataset. One can then say "I made this chart based on this data set from 2013 published here at EEA". That dataset will always be there and show exactly what was used behind that chart.

If we just published latest versions, users would click on the data link below the chart and see other data rather than the data used behind the chart. Users are also made aware that there is a new version of that dataset, with a new URL to be used for linking / data provenance information.

I hope this information is helpful to you.

Kind regards,
 
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